Welcome Newest GtCNN Board Member, Larry Kubal

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Larry Kubal has invested in seed and early stage information technology companies for the last 23 years. He is a founder of Labrador Ventures and serves as a managing partner of Labrador Ventures III, IV and V. Labrador was among the founding investors in Pandora Media, where Larry served on the board for seven years up to the IPO. In Addition, Larry currently serves as the Labrador representative with portfolio companies Altierre, PlayPhone, and RocketFuel.  He was named one of the top 100 venture capitalists in 2013.


In addition to his investment experience, Mr. Kubal was a management consultant with Booz, Allen & Hamilton, a global strategy and technology consulting firm. Prior to consulting, Mr. Kubal worked extensively in computerized database publishing for McGraw-Hill Publications Company and for the Academy for Educational Development. Mr. Kubal was also a founding executive with a venture-backed PC software company, Avalanche Technologies, ultimately acquired by Microsoft.


Larry has also served on the boards of a number of youth and education oriented non-profits.  Currently he is on the national board of CollegeSpring, a nonprofit that partners with schools and community organizations to help students from low-income backgrounds boost SAT scores, navigate college admissions and financial aid, and pursue college degrees. Larry chairs its Finance and Operations Committee.  In addition, he is also an innovation/entrepreneurship task force member for both Duke University and University School of Milwaukee.  Larry is a long time TEDster and a member of the NationSwell council. 


Larry received his undergraduate degree from Duke University (1974) and his MBA from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business (1982).


Why Larry would like to join GtCNN:

"Education has always been a priority to me instilled by my parents. They were from immigrant backgrounds and both first generation college students. I am grateful for the many advantages afforded me. When I consider where to try to make change, there seems nothing more meaningful than changing the trajectory of a young person’s life. The impact of that change is magnified as it is projected through the individual’s adult life as well as through the ripples of all the people with whom he or she interacts. And where can trajectory change be more meaningful and needed than for a student off track or one who has never had the opportunity to be on track.  GtCNN appeals to me not only because of its mission but also because of 1.) its open-minded, intelligent, continual desire to improve culture and 2.) its position as an organization at an inflection point with all the attendant challenges and opportunities that that entails."

Give Education on #GivingTuesday

Monday, November 28, 2016



Dear friends,


Each year, thousands of out-of-school and off track youth reconnect with their education through a Gateway to College program. These young people seize the opportunity offered to them and exceed what they once thought was possible for themselves.


When our 16 to 24 year olds are out of school and out of work, the costs of their nonparticipation are substantial. They lack the ability to support themselves and their families, and they have an increased reliance on public benefits. Through Gateway to College, these young people have a second chance.


Gateway to College National Network helps communities build pathways for disconnected youth to a high school diploma and a meaningful college credential. We launch programs, build collaborative partnerships, and provide coaching, training, and support to our programs. For us to continue our success, we need your support.


Your gift helps us open new doors. For every $100 of private philanthropic dollars we invest, we are able to leverage $1,100 in public dollars.


Please consider a gift on Giving Tuesday, and help Gateway to College National Network put another young person on a pathway to a postsecondary credential and a lifetime of success. We cannot do this work without you. Thank you for your support.


Emily Froimson


President

[Careers] Development and Events Coordinator

Monday, November 28, 2016
Position Announcement
Development and Events Coordinator

Gateway to College National Network (GtCNN) is searching for a Development and Events Coordinator, with responsibilities to organize all aspects of GtCNN’s annual fundraiser, coordinate events and donor campaigns, and support the GtCNN President. This position is part of a five-person Development & Communications team.

GtCNN is a Portland-based education nonprofit organization with partner programs in 21 states. We support communities in building sustainable pathways for disconnected youth to a high school diploma and a meaningful college credential. More information about Gateway to College National Network is available at www.gatewaytocollege.org.

Duties
• Organizes all aspects of GtCNN annual fundraising dinner.
• Coordinates individual donor campaigns, donor renewals, and acknowledgment letters.
• Updates and maintains records in the GtCNN database.
• Coordinates communication with new members and renewals for GtCNN Presidents’ Council.
• Researches prospective donors in targeted regions, arranging meetings with GtCNN President and AVP External Relations, where applicable.
• Coordinates all logistics related to GtCNN events, including Board and Ambassador Council meetings, Gateway Gathering lecture series, donor events, and one-time events, as needed.
• Under the direction of GtCNN President, prepares materials for quarterly Board of Directors meetings.
• Supports GtCNN President on travel logistics and scheduling, and on special projects.
• Supports Director, Foundation Relations in donor research.
• Ensures accuracy, consistency and quality in GtCNN written materials.
• Other related duties which may be necessary to support GtCNN success.

Supervision & Reporting
• This position is an individual contributor and does not have supervisory responsibilities.
• Reports to Associate V.P., External Relations.

Requirements
• Bachelor’s degree and two years of experience in a similar position (ideally within a nonprofit organization).
• Demonstrated experience writing, editing, and proofreading documents for high-level audiences.
• Proficiency in Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Excel and database software.
• Demonstrated experience coordinating event logistics.
• Good creative thinking, planning, time management, project management, and organizational skills.
• Ability to multi-task, prioritize, and work cooperatively in service of the organization’s mission.

Physical Demands / Work Environment:
Majority of work is completed in a general office environment. Minimal travel (10% or less) is required; travel is national in scope requiring travel by air as well as driving.

Compensation:
The starting annual salary for this position is between $35,000 - $40,000, consistent with professional experience and credentials. GtCNN offers a comprehensive benefits package. This is a full-time, salaried position located at the organization’s offices in Portland, Oregon.

TO APPLY: Please email a cover letter and resume to hr@gatewaytocollege.org, with the position title in the subject line. We will begin reviewing materials on Monday, December 19, 2016. The position is open until filled.

Gateway to College National Network does not and shall not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion (creed), gender, gender expression, age, national origin (ancestry), disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or military status, in any of its activities or operations. These activities include, but are not limited to, hiring and firing of staff, selection of volunteers and vendors, and provision of services. We are committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all members of our staff, clients, volunteers, subcontractors, vendors, and clients.

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[Infographic] Equity in Education

Friday, November 18, 2016

Five Questions with GtCNN: Dr. Rassoul Dastmozd

Thursday, November 10, 2016
  1. What systematic reforms are needed to ensure all students receive the individual supports they need to complete high school ready for postsecondary education or training?

  • • We need to rethink the “No Child Left Behind” concept. This concept only worked for the top 30% of high school graduating classes.  Unfortunately, we left the remaining 70% of the high school class behind.
  • • We need to identify students’ needs, align services that are based on promising practices, and use evidence based practices to promote student success.
  • • We need to rethink standardized testing and use alternative and multiple assessment tools.
  • • There must be better alignment between secondary and postsecondary curricula that reduces time to graduation and degree completion by removing barriers to student success; high school curricula should be aligned to give the student deeper levels of “meaningful and measurable College Readiness/Success Skills,” by reducing the needs for remedial and foundation skills once student transitions from high schools to postsecondary institution.

  1. What is the most effective way for higher education and K-12 to work together to support the success of disconnected youth?

  2. There are no “disconnected youth.” There are disconnected systems that create a deficit in achievement levels for students.

  3. As I alluded to earlier, there has to be a consistent coupling and integration of curricula (content and skill sets geared for student success) between secondary and postsecondary institutions.

  4. The process of educating our youth must be engaging and not simply driven by the Eurocentric model of education; yet, it must be culturally specific. 

  5. Gateway to College has proven to be such a model. By simply modifying the learning milieu and engaging students by using meaningful and intentional student success wrap around support services and strategies, positive results of student engagement, persistence, completion, and graduation can be experienced.

  1. What is the value of dual enrollment for young people and for their communities?

  2. It is a great opportunity for students to gain some college credits and experience college courses while attending high school. It helps them to understand the rigor and depth of college courses and they benefit from a cost savings for credits.

  3. The monetary values are cost savings for a high school student who takes college courses while enrolled in high school, cost saving for parents. 

  4. Having said that, dual enrollment is not for every student and not for every subject area.  For the student who takes college courses while attending high school, earning dual credit courses will ultimately lead to faster/earlier graduation and time to completion, which will have perpetual higher earning potential rates for the student. 

 

  1. College access has been receiving considerable attention in recent years. What are the biggest hurdles that remain in this area?

 

  • • Inadequate funding for college access.
  • • Low state funding and high tuition rates.
  • • Rethinking standardized testing, using multiple assessment tools, college readiness and remedial and foundation skills.
  • • Needing a coherent secondary to postsecondary education strategy.
  • • Current system of funding does not address and cannot accommodate the wrap around support services that are high touch and at a higher price point.
  • • Well intentioned advocates that are not practitioners but are advocating for policies to transform a system with complexities of both secondary and postsecondary institutions (i.e. bargaining agreements, state and local policies, and organization’s structure/limitations).
  • • Restrictive accreditation agency policies and compliance.


  1. What advice would you give to civic and state leaders who want to take more of a role in addressing high school graduation and college completion rates?

 

  • • Advocate to fully fund early childhood education. 
  • • Our completion and graduation challenges do not start and take root in high school. The challenges start well before that. We need to fully fund education at every level.
  • • Encourage and advocate for meaningful parent engagement, which is paramount to each child’s success.
  • • Advocate for competitive wages for teachers throughout the spectrum of the education. 
  • • Provide teachers the technology and human resources that they need to ensure student success.
  • • Advocate for safe and welcoming schools, including physical structures.
  • • Adequately fund after-school programs, such as tutoring and mentoring.
  • • Provide students with academic and social skills necessary so they are better prepared for college upon attaining their high school diplomas. 
• Investing in all levels of education should not be solely viewed as another funding mandate, but as a moral obligation and imperative.      

Dr. Rassoul Dastmozd is the president of Saint Paul College and a member of the Gateway Presidents' Circle.

Five Questions with GtCNN: Dr. Eileen Holden

Tuesday, November 01, 2016
What systematic reforms are needed to ensure all students receive the individual supports they need to complete high school ready for postsecondary education or training?
 
Providing career and college advising services to students while they are in high school is critical to helping them understand their options. The average ratio of high school students to guidance counselors is 400-500 to 1, making it impossible for schools to provide adequate support to all students. At Polk State Lakeland Gateway to College Collegiate High School, the ratio is 199 to 1, which is still challenging. Additional advising staff would make it easier to address students’ individual needs.

 
What is the most effective way for higher education and K-12 to work together to support the success of disconnected youth?
 
Collaboration between higher education and K-12 institutions is crucial to supporting disconnected youth. Mentoring programs can provide students with much needed support that they may not receive at home. When K-12 and higher education institutions work together, the success of K-12 students is more viable, and the transition of high school graduates to college programs is less challenging. More opportunities for collaboration between higher education and K-12 institutions are needed.
 

What is the value of dual enrollment for young people and for their communities?
 
Dual enrollment is invaluable. Introducing students to the college environment and academic expectations prepares them for their future college experiences. Dual enrollment eases students into the often intimidating processes of selecting courses, applying for financial aid, accessing academic advising, etc., readying them to successfully navigate college on their own when the time comes.
 

College access has been receiving considerable attention in recent years. What are the biggest hurdles that remain in this area?
 
Affordability is the largest hurdle. A student’s financial situation, even with financial aid, continues to be the largest hurdle to college access. Students are often working multiple jobs in order to support themselves, their families, and their education. These pressures limit the ability of students to complete their college education in a timely fashion.
 

What advice would you give to civic and state leaders who want to take more of a role in addressing high school graduation and college completion rates?
 
Community and corporate partnerships help schools offer more engaging educational experiences to their students. Being able to offer internships at local companies, or through state-funded programs, can go a long way toward increasing high school and college completion rates, because such opportunities help students connect what they’re learning to the real world and set long-term goals for their education and their lives.

Dr. Eileen Holden is the president of Polk State College and a member of the Gateway Presidents' Circle

Five Questions with GtCNN: Rob Denson

Tuesday, October 25, 2016
GtCNN is launching a series, Five Questions with GtCNN, where we ask education, foundation, and community leaders to share their views on a range of questions, including partnerships between K-12 and community colleges and how communities can work together to prepare our most vulnerable youth to succeed in college. Over the course of the next year, we will publish the series on our blog and website, and encourage respondents to share their views with their own audiences.  We hope that the series creates additional dialogue on how communities can work together to create sustainable pathways for disconnected youth to a high school diploma and a meaningful college credential.

By Rob Denson

1. What systematic reforms are needed to ensure all students receive the individual supports they need to complete high school ready for postsecondary education or training? 
I believe that there should be more support and emphasis on the roles that School Counselors can play to improve outcomes for students. Counselor to Student ratios are too high; Counselors are being asked to perform duties that are not the best use of their limited time with students; and, school leadership have not been specifically educated on how to best utilize school counselors to help students.   

2. What is the most effective way for higher education and K-12 to work together to support the success of disconnected youth? 
Legislative funding should encourage and target K-12 and Higher Education partnerships based on outcomes. This may be a good instance where performance-based funding would work. Increase the number of alternative ways for students to get their high school degree.   

3. What is the value of dual enrollment for young people and for their communities? 
The most significant impact in many schools is to allow qualified students to get more rigorous education than might not otherwise be offered by the school. In this day of increased concern about student debt, dual enrollment is one way to shorten time-to-degree and significantly reduce debt. One big savings is that dual enrolled students are generally living at home rather than paying for an apartment away from home with all the associated costs.   

4. College access has been receiving considerable attention in recent years. What are the biggest hurdles that remain in this area? 
I believe that there is an access option for everyone. Clearly, students may not get the specific option they may desire but they can fashion an option that they can afford and is close to them.   

5. What advice would you give to civic and state leaders who want to take more of a role in addressing high school graduation and college completion rates? 
We know that the more individual support and encouragement each student can receive the more likely it is that the student will complete successfully. State leaders should look at the individualized attention students can receive and the availability of funds that could help students deal with small financial emergencies. How are students who face “life and family issues” supported?


Rob Denson is president of Des Moines Area Community College in Des Moines, Iowa, and serves on GtCNN's board as vice chair. Rob is also a member of the Gateway Presidents' Circle, a collection of community college presidents committed to serving out-of-school and off-track youth. Read more about Rob here. 

[Careers] Data Analyst/Research Assistant

Monday, October 24, 2016
Position Announcement
Data Analyst/ Research Assistant

Gateway to College National Network (GtCNN) is a Portland-based education nonprofit organization with partner programs in 21 states. GtCNN replicates and supports programs on college campuses across the country serving dropped-out and off-track high school students as well as underprepared college students. Founded at Portland Community College, the Gateway to College program now operates at 41 colleges in partnership with well over 100 school districts. More information about Gateway to College National Network is available at: www.gatewaytocollege.org

This position is part of the Research & Evaluation team. Our team of four collaborates together to support program evaluation, research, and reporting requirements for the organization. 
GtCNN is an equal opportunity employer and is actively seeking to increase the diversity of its workforce.

Duties
• Designs, modifies, and supports extensive data collection systems using Access, SQL, Excel and new tools as acquired
• Trains local program staff in support of data collection and database usage through on-line training modules, group training webinars and individualized technical assistance
• Coordinates multiple projects, including overseeing timelines of data submission and ensuring data quality to support program evaluation
• Identifies multiple methods for data collection and implements strategies to collect data from community colleges and school districts
• Works with national program staff to develop meaningful analyses for stakeholder and client reporting
• Communicates complex results to lay and research audiences
• Collaborates with the team to create meaningful monitoring metrics and evaluation results
• Coordinates successful completion of projects and ensures quality meets established goals
• Serves as contact for IT providers
• Other related duties which may be necessary to support GtCNN success

Supervision & Reporting
• This position is an individual contributor and does not have supervisory responsibilities
• Reports to Senior Manager of Research

Requirements
• Master’s Degree in Social Science, Education, Human Development, Public Administration, Computer Science, Information Sciences, or other research oriented fields, OR comparable experience in the field.
• Proficiency in SQL, Access, and Excel
• Ability to effectively share results across multiple audiences with differing levels of education and expertise
• Strong independent problem solving skills
• Ability and willingness to travel nationally (less than 10%)
• Ability to work collaboratively in a fast-paced and diverse team environment

Preferred
• Proficiency in statistical software (such as stata, SPSS, SAS, R)
• Exposure to business and academic analytics a plus
• Experience in K-12 or college data systems
• Proficiency in business intelligence platforms such as Tableau
• Comfortable troubleshooting technology issues and coordinating with IT support providers
• Experience using GIS and spatial data

Physical Demands / Work Environment:
Majority of work is completed in a general office environment with exposure to moderate levels of noise in a well-lit, well-ventilated and fast paced environment; continuously required to read computer screen. Minimal travel (10% or less) is required; travel is national in scope requiring travel by air as well as driving; a valid driver’s license is required.

Compensation:
The starting annual salary for this position is between $40,000 - $45,000, consistent with professional experience and credentials. GtCNN offers a comprehensive benefits package. This is a full-time, exempt position located at the organization’s offices in Portland, Oregon.

TO APPLY: Please email a cover letter and resume to hr@gatewaytocollege.org. This position is open until filled.

[Careers] Regional Director for New England

Monday, October 24, 2016

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT
Regional Director for New England


Gateway to College National Network (GtCNN) is a Portland, Oregon-based education nonprofit organization with partner programs in 20 states. GtCNN replicates and supports programs on college campuses across the country serving out of school and off-track youth as well as underprepared college students. Founded at Portland Community College, the Gateway to College program now operates at 39 colleges in partnership with over 100 school districts. More information about Gateway to College National Network is available at: www.gatewaytocollege.org


The Regional Director for New England is a remote employee of GtCNN who will develop and support a community of practice among all Gateway to College programs in New England. The Regional Director will provide guidance and support to local programs, in order to assist them to improve student performance outcomes as well as maintain sustainable programs and partnerships.

RESPONSIBILITIES
Quality Implementation (60%)*
• Provide training and coaching to new Gateway to College programs
• Support and coordinate effective program practices to ensure timely data collection and accountability reporting
• Provide support and guidance to New England Gateway to College programs in support of achieving student performance benchmarks
• Support programs’ continuous improvement processes based on fidelity to GtCNN’s essential elements and evidence-based strategies that contribute to student success

Facilitate a Community of Practice (30%)*
• Act as a primary point of contact to GtCNN for New England-based Gateway to College programs and connect programs to other resources as needed
• Facilitate the development of a regional community of practice, document and share best practices among programs
• Support and coordinate communication and reporting by local Gateway programs to GtCNN and state departments of education

Regional Sustainability (10%)*
• Develop and strengthen local networks and stakeholder relationships, including college and school district leadership, workforce boards, and state departments of education
• Secure resources for program and network sustainability through fundraising and developing local partnerships
• Identify community volunteers to serve as GtCNN ambassadors. In collaboration with GtCNN staff, launch an ambassador council to build community support for New England programs and raise funds for GtCNN
*The estimated percentage of time spent on each responsibility during the first year on the job is listed above. GtCNN expects that over a three year period, the balance of activities will shift and the amount of time spent will be evenly split between each responsibility.

SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITIES
• This position is an individual contributor and does not have supervisory responsibilities

REQUIREMENTS
• Familiarity with alternative education programs; leadership or administrative experience in alternative education programs preferred
• Familiarity with early or middle college, or dual enrollment programming
• High level of passion, interest and expertise working with low income, first generation, students of color; understands barriers that lead to achievement gaps in K-12 and college systems
• Comfort with working independently and remotely
• Strong public speaking with presentation skills
• Experience engaging funders and foundations, and ability to facilitate proposals at a statewide or regional level a plus
• Familiarity with the Gateway to College program model preferred
• The candidate will reside in either Massachusetts, Connecticut, or Rhode Island
• Master’s degree preferred, or a Bachelor’s Degree along with significant experience commensurate with the role is required

PHYSICAL DEMANDS / WORK ENVIRONMENT
Majority of work is completed in a home office environment with continuous exposure to computer screen. Frequent regional travel by car and air as well as occasional national travel, including travel to GtCNN offices in Portland, Oregon is required. A valid driver’s license is required. This is a full-time, exempt position located in Massachusetts, Connecticut, or Rhode Island.

COMPENSATION
The starting annual salary for this position is consistent with professional experience and credentials. GtCNN offers a comprehensive benefits and vacation package which includes 19 days of vacation and personal time in the first year. This is a full-time, home-based exempt position with expectations of work throughout New England.

TO APPLY
For best consideration, please email a cover letter, resume, and answers to the supplemental questions to Alina Randall, arandall@gatewaytocollege.org by October 31st, 2016. Incomplete applications will not be considered. This position is considered open until filled.

REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTAL QUESTION
In addition to a cover letter and resume, please include a response to the following prompt:
• How has your prior experience and passion for working in alternative education serving opportunity youth prepared you to be successful in this role? What skillsets do you bring to the position?

Gateway to College National Network does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion (creed), gender, gender expression, age, national origin (ancestry), disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or military status, in any of its activities or operations. These activities include, but are not limited to, hiring and firing of staff, selection of volunteers and vendors, and provision of services. We are committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all members of our staff, clients, volunteers, subcontractors, vendors, and clients.

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Three Ways Your Company Can Support Youth to College and Career

Wednesday, October 19, 2016


There is an old song called “Both Sides Now” that makes me think of my role at Silicon Forest Electronics and my involvement on the Ambassador Council with Gateway to College National Network. In this role, I’m fortunate to see a contrast of opportunity from “both sides”. My business supports the aerospace industry, where more than 30% of the workforce is over the age of 55. When you consider the continued growth of aerospace and the emerging demand of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, significant employment opportunities for youth are available. We need to work together to help these young people become aware of and excited about career opportunities in the industry!   


In my work with Gateway to College National Network and the Gateway program at Portland Community College, a few simple steps have helped us develop a closer to tie to our future workforce. Here are three ways that your company can also help make that happen:


1 – Invite youth into your operations to see how things are made

As industry leaders, we should all accept the challenge to show youth what is possible, invite them into our operations to see how things are made. Many of them may not have visited the inside of a real manufacturing operation, and may have misconceptions about “manufacturing”. When they get to see the level of automation and technology they get excited! Likewise, seeing the diversity of people in your company gives allows them to visualize how they might be a part of something bigger.


2 - Get out into the community and schools - share what you do

At Silicon Forest Electronics, we regularly visit schools, both middle schools and high schools, to participate in mock interviews, give presentations about aircraft and unmanned systems, and to give students a glimpse into our careers. The exchange process is wonderful – the students are eager to see “cool stuff” first hand and our employees get to make an impact by sharing why and how they got into their careers.


3 - Stimulate and encourage more apprenticeships and internships

We have two paid internships annually (6 months each) and we recently had our first high school intern. There are great community partners in Oregon & Washington who can help coordinate internships. We believe that there are even greater opportunities to develop internships and reduce barriers for at-risk youth to obtain internships while going to school. We just need to connect and get creative!


By making a greater, seamless connection between industry and education, our youth can visualize themselves in future roles that build upon their unique skill sets, a benefit to “both sides”. Get involved with organizations like Gateway to College National Network – invest your time as an employer in councils, boards and committees in your local and regional organizations. Your investment will help our youth develop as individuals and support our overall economic growth with a thriving workforce!


Oregon: Opportunity Youth and Graduation Rates





 
 

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